A battle is brewing between the
immediate past Inspector General of
Police, Solomon Arase, and his
successor, Ibrahim Idris, over the claim
by Mr. Idris that his former boss went
away with 24 police vehicles after he
retired from service.
The Punch newspaper quoted Mr Idris as
saying at a press conference, Sunday,
that the 24 vehicles Mr Arase refused to
return to the police included two bullet-
proof BMW 7 series.
He also reportedly alleged that the deputy
Inspector Generals who retired alongside
Mr. Arase also left with between seven
and eight cars each.
Mr. Idris told journalists in Abuja that a
special investigation team was already
probing the number of vehicles purchased
by the police in the last three years and
how they were distributed.
The acting Inspector General also said he
had written to his predecessor and other
recently retired senior police officers to
return the vehicles in their possession.
“So, what I am telling you is that I have
signed a directive to my SIP (I have a
special investigation panel, I set it up). It
is going to investigate all the vehicle
purchases, contributions to the police and
the distribution of those vehicles in the
last three years; we are going to look into
that.
“When I took over, there was no vehicle,
even the vehicle I would use. I discovered
the last IG went away with 24 vehicles;
the DIGs, some of them eight, some of
them seven. The IG’s vehicles included
two BMW 7 series, one armoured; and he
left me with an old car.
“The last time I followed the President
with it, he was asking me, ‘what are you
doing with this old car’ because if you see
the headlight, the thing has changed
colour, which means they parked it and
rains and everything had fallen on it, but
the new ones that were bought, he
(Arase) went with all of them; they are
part of the 24.
“I wrote back to him and said, we have a
policy that says when a policeman retires,
if you are an IG, AIG, a CP, you are
entitled to some vehicles; please, the
extra, return it. Four vehicles are enough
for an average human being, but what will
you even do with four vehicles; but he
took 24 vehicles, including two BMW cars.
“I wrote to him (Arase), I wrote to the
DIGs.”
He said he was baffled that cars that were
parked at the force headquarters
transport department disappeared just a
week before he assumed duties as
Inspector General.
“If you look through the windows of my
former office and from the report from my
(Force) transport officer, you would see
cars but a week to the day I would
resume, all these cars disappeared.”
However, Mr. Arase denied the allegation,
describing it as a malicious propaganda.
He said Mr. Idris should focus on
confronting the security challenges in the
country instead of wasting time on
“media propaganda.”
“What am I going to do with 24 cars? Do I
want to open a car shop? This is a
malicious accusation. There are ways of
verifying issues rather than engaging in
media propaganda,” The Punch quoted
the former police boss as saying.
Meanwhile, Mr. Idris has vowed to
investigate the complaints by some
officers over unfair promotions and
postings. He said he has set up a probe
panel to investigate if the promotions
were in line with the dictates of the police
service commission.

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